Templates

Balance Sheet Template - Excel

Determine your company's performance and compare year-to-year changes in current assets, long-term assets, current liabilities, long-term liabilities, and equity.

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The Balance Sheet Template helps you:
  • Display a summary of your company's assets, liabilities, and shareholder equities.
  • Compare year-to-year increases or decreases in assets and liabilities.
  • Have a picture of the total assets owned by your business and how they are financed, either through debt or equity to make more informed business decisions.
About the Balance Sheet template

What is a Balance Sheet?

A balance sheet is a financial statement that shows an entity's assets, liabilities, and equity at a specific point in time. Assets are resources owned by an entity that have economic value. Liabilities refer to obligations or debts owed by the entity to another party. Equity is the difference between assets and liabilities; it is what remains after all liabilities have been paid off. The balance sheet presents a picture of the entity's financial position, and understanding this information is key to making smart financial decisions.

What is on a Balance Sheet?

The balance sheet is divided into two sections: assets and liabilities. In the asset section, you will see things like cash, inventory, and accounts receivable. In the liabilities section, you will find items such as loans, accounts payable, and taxes owed. The equity section of the balance sheet shows the net worth of the entity; it is calculated by subtracting total liabilities from total assets.

What Is the Purpose of a Balance Sheet?

The information presented in a balance sheet can be used to assess the financial health of an entity. By looking at the numbers, you can get a sense of how much debt the entity has, what kind of cash flow it has, and how much equity the entity holds. This information can then be used to make decisions about how to manage the business going forward.

What Does a Balance Sheet Show?

The balance sheet shows the assets, liabilities, and equity of an entity. Assets are resources that have economic value and are owned by the entity. Liabilities refer to debts owed by the entity to another party. Equity is what remains after all liabilities have been paid off; it represents ownership in the company and its ability to generate profits over time.

The balance sheet also shows how much capital the entity has to cover its liabilities. This information can be used to assess the financial position of an entity and make informed decisions about investments, funding, and future operations.

What Is the Difference Between a Balance Sheet and Income Statement?

The balance sheet is a financial statement that provides an overview of assets, liabilities, and equity at a given point in time. In contrast, an income statement is a financial statement that summarizes revenue, expenses, and profit over a period of time.

The balance sheet provides insight into the company's financial position on a single day, whereas the income statement summarizes performance over many days. It is also important to note that while the balance sheet includes all assets, liabilities, and equity, the income statement does not have balance sheet items.

The balance sheet and the income statement are two key financial statements used to assess a company's performance. By understanding each one's purpose and how they work together, investors can gain valuable insight into the health of a business.

How Does a Balance Sheet Help Investors?

A balance sheet can help investors assess the financial health of a company. By analyzing the assets and liabilities listed on the balance sheet, investors can get a better understanding of how much debt the company has and its ability to generate future cash flows. Additionally, investors can use ratio analysis to compare a company's performance to competitors and industry averages.

Overall, the balance sheet is an essential tool for investors and provides valuable insight into a company's financial position. With this knowledge, investors can make more informed decisions about their investments.

How to Make a Balance Sheet?

When creating a balance sheet, it is crucial to begin by listing all entity-owned assets. This could include cash, property, equipment, investments, and inventory. It is then necessary to list all liabilities owed by the entity. This could include loans, accounts payable, and any taxes owed.

Once these items have been listed, subtract total liabilities from total assets to calculate the entity's equity. After these calculations are complete, a balance sheet can be prepared which shows assets, liabilities, and equity in a simple and easy-to-read format. This can be especially helpful for entities looking to make financial decisions such as investments or funding.

How to Read a Balance Sheet?

A balance sheet is read from left to right, with the asset section at the left, liabilities in the center, and equity on the right. To understand how to read a balance sheet, it helps to know a few key terms.

  • Assets are listed in order of liquidity, which is the ease with which they can be converted into cash. Current assets are those that can easily be converted to cash within one year, such as cash, inventory, and accounts receivable. Non-current assets are those that cannot be converted to cash quickly, such as buildings, equipment, and investments.
  • Liabilities are also listed in order of liquidity, with current liabilities at the top, such as accounts payable and short-term debts. Non-current liabilities represent long-term obligations such as mortgages and bonds.
  • The equity section includes the total value of the entity's owners' investments, as well as retained earnings (profits that have been reinvested in the business). This is also known as book value or shareholders' equity.

For more information and examples, check out our post on How to Read a Balance Sheet.

What Are Assets on a Balance Sheet?

Assets are resources that have economic value and are owned by the entity. Assets can include cash, inventory, accounts receivable, buildings, equipment, investments, and other property. Assets must be listed in order of liquidity on a balance sheet; current assets are those that can easily be converted to cash within one year, while non-current assets are those that cannot be converted to cash quickly.

What Are Liabilities on a Balance Sheet?

Liabilities refer to debts owed by the entity to another party. Liabilities must be listed in order of liquidity on a balance sheet; current liabilities are those that must be paid within one year, while non-current liabilities represent long-term obligations such as mortgages and bonds. Examples of liabilities include accounts payable, short-term debts, loans, and taxes owed.

What Is Equity on a Balance Sheet?

Equity is the value of assets owned by an entity minus any liabilities owed. This is also known as shareholders' equity or book value and appears in the rightmost column of a balance sheet. Equity reflects the total amount invested by owners into the entity and all retained earnings that have been reinvested in the business.

What Is Accounts Payable on a Balance Sheet?

Accounts payable is a term used to describe the money owed by an entity to its vendors and suppliers. This type of liability appears in the liabilities section of a balance sheet, usually at the top, as it is one of the most liquid forms of debt. Accounts payable is recorded when goods or services are purchased on credit and can be paid off in short amounts of time.

What Is Net Income on a Balance Sheet?

Net income is a key indicator of financial performance, and it can be calculated from the balance sheet by subtracting total liabilities from total assets. This calculation gives you your net worth, which is the difference between what you own (assets) and what you owe (liabilities).

How to Calculate Net Income From Balance Sheet?

To calculate net income, start by adding up all the assets. Subtract from that total the sum of all liabilities (short-term and long-term). The final number is your net income.

For example, let's say you have $50,000 in assets and $20,000 in liabilities. Your net income would be $30,000 ($50,000 - $20,000 = $30,000).

What Is Retained Earnings on a Balance Sheet?

Retained earnings (also known as retained profits) are the net income that a company chooses to reinvest in itself rather than distributing to shareholders as dividends.

How to Calculate Retained Earnings on Balance Sheet?

Retained earnings can be calculated from the balance sheet by subtracting the beginning balance of retained earnings from the current period's net income, then adding back any dividends paid out during that period.

For example, let's say you had $10,000 in retained earnings at the beginning of a period, earned $30,000 in net income during that period, and paid out $1,000 in dividends. Your retained earnings for the period would be $39,000 ($10,000 + $30,000 - $1,000 = $39,000).

What Is Goodwill on a Balance Sheet?

Goodwill is an intangible asset representing the excess amount paid for a business acquisition over the fair market value of its individual assets. Goodwill is recorded as an asset on the balance sheet and can increase or decrease over time depending on how well the business is performing.

How to Calculate Goodwill on Balance Sheet?

Goodwill can be calculated from the balance sheet by subtracting the fair market value of the company's assets from the purchase price paid to acquire it.

For example, let's say you purchased a business for $500,000, and the fair market value of its individual assets was calculated at $450,000. The goodwill would be $50,000 ($500,000 - $450,000 = $50,000).

What Is Common Stock on a Balance Sheet?

Common stock is a type of security that represents ownership in a company. It gives investors the right to vote on certain corporate decisions and receive dividends if the company pays them. Common stock also entitles holders to a portion of the company's assets and profits in case it is ever dissolved.

How to Calculate Common Stock on Balance Sheet?

Common stock can be calculated from the balance sheet by subtracting total preferred stock from total equity. This calculation will give you the amount of common stock outstanding.

For example, let's say you had $100,000 in total equity and $25,000 in preferred stock. Your common stock would be $75,000 ($100,000 - $25,000 = $75,000).

Which Account Does Not Appear on the Balance Sheet?

Revenue and expenses do not appear on the balance sheet since they are transactions that occur over a period of time. Revenue is recorded in the income statement, while expenses are recorded in the statement of changes in equity.

What Is a Classified Balance Sheet?

A classified balance sheet is a financial statement that organizes assets and liabilities into categories. This makes it easier to analyze the data and perform ratio analysis to compare different periods of performance. Common classifications used in a classified balance sheet include current assets, long-term investments, fixed assets, and current liabilities.

In a Classified Balance Sheet, How Are Assets Usually Classified?

In a classified balance sheet, assets are typically classified according to their liquidity and/or turnover. This includes current assets (cash, accounts receivable, inventory, etc.), long-term investments (bonds, stocks, real estate), and fixed assets (land, buildings, equipment).

In a Classified Balance Sheet, How Are Liabilities Usually Classified?

In a classified balance sheet, liabilities are typically classified according to their due date. This includes current liabilities (accounts payable, taxes, wages payable) and long-term liabilities (mortgages, loans).

These classifications can also be used to calculate key financial ratios, such as the debt-to-equity ratio and the current ratio, which measure a company's financial health. By understanding how to use a classified balance sheet, you can get an accurate picture of a company's financial situation and make more informed decisions.

The classification of assets and liabilities on the balance sheet can be helpful in helping business owners and investors evaluate a company's financial position.

What is a Balance Sheet Excel Template?

A balance sheet template is a pre-formatted spreadsheet used to record and track assets, liabilities, and equity. The balance sheet is an important financial document that provides an overview of a company's assets, liabilities, and shareholders' equity at any given point in time. A balanced sheet template can help you quickly create accurate and up-to-date balance sheets. It can also be used to compare financial performance over time and analyze the relationships between different accounts.

Why Use a Balance Sheet Template?

Using a balance sheet template can help you save time by providing an easy-to-use format for entering financial data. It also eliminates the need to manually calculate totals and ratios, which can be complicated to do accurately. Balance sheets are a vital part of any company's financial health, so it is crucial to have accurate and up-to-date information. A balance sheet template can help you easily track this data, making it easier to make informed decisions and understand the financial health of your business.

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Conclusion

By studying a balance sheet, you can understand an entity's financial position and make informed decisions about how to manage its resources. You can also use the balance sheet to compare the performance of one entity to another.

Knowing how to read a balance sheet is an integral part of financial literacy and can help you make smart decisions about your own financial future. With a little bit of practice and an understanding of the key terms, you can interpret a balance sheet with confidence.

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